Integral Without Borders Sangha Call

Transformational Change in Development


Our third Integral Without Borders Community Call will be on Dec 7th, 2013.

Our intention with these IWB sangha calls is to co-create the kind of 'integral community' we want, one that is deep and wise in its content, supportive in its interpersonal connections, and world-centric (even kosmo-centric!) in it's moral embrace. Each call will focus on an aspect of integral practice in development with certain practitioners leading on these topics and with participants contributing examples from their integral projects.

Saturday, Dec 7th, 9-10:30am Pacific Standard Time. (Find your time zone here).

Register: If you intend to attend, please be sure to drop us an email, so that we know you're intending to be on the call and also so that we can send you the audio clip afterwards.

How: The conference call line is a North American number, but it can be accessed by calling the number via skype.
Conference Dial-in Number: +1 (605) 475-4810
Participant Access Code: 988715#

Price: For now, while we fine-tune these sangha calls, they will be by donation. Go here for donations and to read more about the call.

Topic: The topic of the first part of the call will be on working with transformational change in development, using Otto Scharmer's U Process. Read below for more context about this topic, as a way to seed the discussion.
 

Engaging a Truly Transformational Change

In development, we are in the business of change: hoping to lay emergent ground for a transformation from one situation to ideally one that is better. I say "ideally" since often that is not what actually happens. Rather, the situation reverts back to it's initial state. An actual transformation is frankly hard to come by. The reasons why are many, but among them is the sheer fact that we humans have a tendency to resist change. We resist things that challenge our status quo, that challenge us to move out of our comfort zone, even when that comfort zone is one that provokes suffering. This is true at both in individual as well as with groups; this resistance occurs in therapy sessions, in families, in board rooms of organizations, as well as in villages and nation-states.

Otto Scharmer's U Process offers a useful tool to engage this transformational change, where participants suspend their conditioned, habitual ways of acting, letting go of preconceived notions and previously-taken actions to sit in the open and spacious state of non-doing (the 'bottom of the U'). From that spaciousness arises a new manifestation, usually one that has not been predetermined and is a truly creative expression or embodiment. It's essentially a shift in consciousness from the gross state of everyday mind into a deeper state of the non-conceptual mind and then moving back into the gross state but, ideally, this time with some wisdom, unbounded by habitual action, arising as a true transformation.

One of Integral Without Borders member, Anne Caspari, has worked with U Process for many years, and she has encountered some intriguing patterns of resistance that consistently show up. She's been compiling tools to move through those various resistances. Those resistances can be an important part of this process, as Peter Senge explains, “The gap between vision and current reality is also a source of energy. If there were no gap, there would be no need for any action to move towards the vision. We call this gap creative tension.” On our call in October, Anne Caspari covered various ways she's been going about working with resistance and using that creative tension towards transformational change. But there is obviously much more material here to work with and it seemed to warrant another call to continue the conversation. So, for the December call, we'll continue on this same topic.

We include below Anne's short paper on this, and the diagrams that go with this can be downloaded here.

When Reality hits, use its Force 

Anne Caspari - augMentor @ integralMENTORS and Integral Strategist

“The difficulty we have in accepting responsibility for our behavior lies in the desire to avoid the pain of the consequences of that behavior” M. Scott Peck

Follow the intensity of your resistance down to its source and sure enough you will find a treasure.

With transformation work, encountering and overcoming resistances is an intrinsic part of the game. In coaching and facilitating transformative change, people naturally face stages of resistance, fear and confusion. This will inevitably trigger escape and protection mechanisms of the self/Self system that come in a multitude of shapes, sizes and flavours.

Many of these take the form of well-rehearsed identities (e.g. spiritual identities, cynical attitudes, attack of coach or method, sudden shift of priorities) that are designed to ‘protect’ the coachee from the suspected pain of re-owning deeper lying disassociated parts (shadows). These defence mechanisms can easily sabotage the transformative process. In many cases, the coachee is not aware of these phenomena, but rather strongly identified with them. Kegan and Lahey (2009) define this as “Immunity to Change”, a "hidden commitment", with an underlying root cause, that competes and conflicts with a stated commitment to change. It is these hidden commitments that cause people to not change and to fail to realise their best intentions. It takes experience to spot such phenomena and to defuse or utilize any deviating construct arising in the space appropriately, in real time.
In the previous paper I listed the various stages of a typical transformative process. Now I add to that the typical resistance patterns that often correlate to the stations on the track. Fortunately, these patterns tend to have a recognizable sequence.

An experienced coach can identify them and knows how far or deep a group or an individual is on their way through the process and what is still ahead of them relative to their goal. The good news is that there are plenty of extremely good tools available.

Tool boxes

Based on more than a decade of practical experience with coaching transformational change processes in adult development, combined with the application of integral theory on facilitating change in personal to global strategic projects, I have started to map out recognizable patterns that show up consistently as indicators of specific stages of the transformation process in individuals and groups. Resistance patterns or pathologies can of course vary in flavour and form depending on the kosmic address or altitude of the group or person in the process. If level-specific mechanisms show up, they are best addressed with tools and approaches that correspond well with that specific developmental level. Escape patterns and pathologies in different states of consciousness are harder to recognize and require, as always the full experience and presence of the coach.

These diagrams are intended to provide hands-on practical information that is hopefully useful to practitioners dealing with transformational change. I have listed a number of tools and methods that have proven appropriate and extremely useful in coaching people back on track in their movement through transformational processes.

Resistances are treasure indicators

In transformation work we encounter a lot of fear and collective shadow around resistance and blocks, not just in the coachees, but also with some coaches and trainers. These tensions can and should be harvested. It requires some cleaning up and practice, like mental aikido training, to recognize obstructing, attacking or resisting forces as forces to work with and as pointers and key indicators to the most important acupuncture points for change, much like a treasure map. Furthermore, if the transformational process is designed to prototype new ideas, listening to the information sitting on resistances and fears can actually provide the breakthrough that is called for. Then, working with resistances can even be like a fun ride in a roller coaster or like a ride on a sail boat using the resistance to propel you in the direction of your conscious choice.

Graphics for ‘Working With Resistance -When Reality hits, use its Force’ - Anne Caspari

For those who would like more detailed versions of the graphics discussed in Anne Caspari's Paper [October and November 2013 Sangha calls] they can be downloaded from the link below.

 

Authored or produced by: 
Anne Caspri
Publication or release date: 
2013

Our second IWB Sangha call will be on October 26th, 9am PST, on the topic of Working With Resistence using Otto Scharmer's U Process. Our leader for this call is Anne Caspari from Italy, who has worked in sustainability for many years in different parts of the planet such as the Middle East and Africa. Her short article that will provide some content for this call is included here and can be downloaded here too.

Register: If you intend to attend, please be sure to drop us an email.

How: The conference call line is a North American number, but it can be accessed by calling the number via skype.
Conference Dial-in Number: (605) 475-4810
Participant Access Code: 988715#

Price: For now, while we fine-tune these sangha calls, they will be by donation. (We are currently raising funds for IWB's participation in the integral sustainable supply chain work taking place in partnership with One Sky in Peru and Bolivia.)

   

Topic: The topic of the first part of the call will be, "Working with Resistance in International Development." Read below for more context about this topic, as a way to seed the discussion.

When Reality hits, use its Force 

Anne Caspari - Fellow at integralMENTORS and Integral Strategist at Mindshift-Integral

“The difficulty we have in accepting responsibility for our behavior lies in the desire to avoid the pain of the consequences of that behavior” M. Scott Peck

Follow the intensity of your resistance down to its source and sure enough you will find a treasure.

With transformation work, encountering and overcoming resistances is an intrinsic part of the game. In coaching and facilitating transformative change, people naturally face stages of resistance, fear and confusion. This will inevitably trigger escape and protection mechanisms of the self/Self system that come in a multitude of shapes, sizes and flavours.

Many of these take the form of well-rehearsed identities (e.g. spiritual identities, cynical attitudes, attack of coach or method, sudden shift of priorities) that are designed to ‘protect’ the coachee from the suspected pain of re-owning deeper lying disassociated parts (shadows). These defence mechanisms can easily sabotage the transformative process. In many cases, the coachee is not aware of these phenomena, but rather strongly identified with them. Kegan and Lahey (2009) define this as “Immunity to Change”, a "hidden commitment", with an underlying root cause, that competes and conflicts with a stated commitment to change. It is these hidden commitments that cause people to not change and to fail to realise their best intentions. It takes experience to spot such phenomena and to defuse or utilize any deviating construct arising in the space appropriately, in real time.
In the previous paper I listed the various stages of a typical transformative process. Now I add to that the typical resistance patterns that often correlate to the stations on the track. Fortunately, these patterns tend to have a recognizable sequence.

An experienced coach can identify them and knows how far or deep a group or an individual is on their way through the process and what is still ahead of them relative to their goal. The good news is that there are plenty of extremely good tools available.

Tool boxes

Based on more than a decade of practical experience with coaching transformational change processes in adult development, combined with the application of integral theory on facilitating change in personal to global strategic projects, I have started to map out recognizable patterns that show up consistently as indicators of specific stages of the transformation process in individuals and groups. Resistance patterns or pathologies can of course vary in flavour and form depending on the kosmic address or altitude of the group or person in the process. If level-specific mechanisms show up, they are best addressed with tools and approaches that correspond well with that specific developmental level. Escape patterns and pathologies in different states of consciousness are harder to recognize and require, as always the full experience and presence of the coach.

These diagrams are intended to provide hands-on practical information that is hopefully useful to practitioners dealing with transformational change. I have listed a number of tools and methods that have proven appropriate and extremely useful in coaching people back on track in their movement through transformational processes.

Resistances are treasure indicators

In transformation work we encounter a lot of fear and collective shadow around resistance and blocks, not just in the coachees, but also with some coaches and trainers. These tensions can and should be harvested. It requires some cleaning up and practice, like mental aikido training, to recognize obstructing, attacking or resisting forces as forces to work with and as pointers and key indicators to the most important acupuncture points for change, much like a treasure map. Furthermore, if the transformational process is designed to prototype new ideas, listening to the information sitting on resistances and fears can actually provide the breakthrough that is called for. Then, working with resistances can even be like a fun ride in a roller coaster or like a ride on a sail boat using the resistance to propel you in the direction of your conscious choice. Welcome to the world of trim tabs.

“The gap between vision and current reality is also a source of energy. If there were no gap, there would be no need for any action to move towards the vision. We call this gap creative tension.” Peter Senge


Sources: Anne Caspari, Mindshift   http://www.mindshift-integral.com/

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Integral Without Borders Sangha Call: Working with Shadow in Development


Our first Integral Without Borders Community Call begins this month! Our intention with these IWB sangha calls is to co-create the kind of 'integral community' we want, one that is deep and wise in its content, supportive in its interpersonal connections, and world-centric (even kosmo-centric!) in it's moral embrace. Each call will focus on an aspect of integral practice in development, often touching on the subjects that are difficult or edgy and yet are exceedingly important in the field. We are also asking certain practitioners to share on their own topics and high/low points of their integral projects.

We've had to make a change in the date for this first call. It will now be held on Saturday, Sept 28th, 9-10:30am Pacific Daylight Time. (Find your time zone here).

Register: If you intend to attend, please be sure to drop us an email.

How: The conference call line is a North American number, but it can be accessed by calling the number via skype.
Conference Dial-in Number: (605) 475-4810
Participant Access Code: 988715#

Price: For now, while we fine-tune these sangha calls, they will be by donation. (We are currently raising funds for IWB's participation in the integral sustainable supply chain work taking place in partnership with One Sky in Peru and Bolivia.)

Topic: The topic of the first part of the call will be, "Working with Shadow in International Development." Read below for more context about this topic, as a way to seed the discussion.
 

Working with Shadow in International Development – Discussion paper [043]


By, Anna Cowen  – member of IWB, integralMENTORS Fellow and Director of Meshfield

Everyone carries a shadow, and the less it is embodied in the individual’s conscious life, the blacker and denser it is. At all counts, it forms an unconscious snag, thwarting our most well-meant intentions.”    C. G. Jung*

“Yet there is a mystery here, and it is not one that I understand: Without this sting of otherness, of – even – the vicious, without the terrible energies of the underside of health, sanity, sense, then nothing works or can work. I tell you that goodness – what we in our ordinary daylight selves call goodness: the ordinary, the decent – these are nothing without the hidden powers that pour forth continually from their shadow sides.”    Doris Lessing*

The world of international development is particularly rich in potential around shadow work – one of the key dimensions of the Integral model. In many instances the practitioner is working in a foreign context, in a culture they know either nothing or only a little about, and where they are not first language speakers of the local language. The global South is littered with the unintended casualties of well-intentioned development workers. The desire to “do good, to help” is no guarantee that “good” will be done. Indeed, often the opposite emerges, clothed in fine sounding words.  There is an interesting chapter in Nassim Taleb’s recent book “Anti Fragile” where he talks to this, titled “Naïve Intervention”. As he notes, there is even a name for “damage from treatment in excess of the benefits” – iatrogenics, meaning “caused by the healer”.

Foregrounding this awareness, and working both compassionately and fearlessly with one’s “self-as-instrument”, has the potential to be a powerful spiritual practice. And the same goes for consciously working with cultural shadow in the collective, as well as when opening a dialogue with the shadow dimensions of the physical contexts of international development. This is the first of three linked short papers on this topic exploring this idea in self, culture and nature.

The underpinning premise to shadow work as presented in these short papers is two interconnected concepts - that “what is without, is within”, and that at some level, all phenomena interpenetrate. Or put in another way, if we, either as individuals or as a group, find ourselves reacting strongly to something – a person, a situation, a place – in either a negative or a positive way, then that reactivity is the sign-post or indicator that there is a dimension of our being (either individual, collective or both) that is not yet known to our conscious selves, that is in “shadow”, and following this, at some level, “your shadow is my shadow is our shadow is your shadow is ..”. The “We” in this story about international development can take so many forms – Integral practitioners, international development practitioners, field workers, donors, recipients, people from the Global North, English first language speakers, North Americans, South Africans of European descent, women farmers in rural Mozambique, AIDS orphans in Zimbabwe, people living on less than a dollar a day.. and so on - our multiple human identities - context dependent. And embedded in these expressions of “We” are holonic fractals, each ripe with cultural shadow. 

The metaphor of Indra’s Net, from the Avatamsaka Sutra, which is used to illustrate the Buddhist concept of the interpenetration of all phenomena, can be a useful metaphor for thinking about this.

"Far away in the heavenly abode of the great god Indra, there is a wonderful net which has been hung by some cunning artificer in such a manner that it stretches out infinitely in all directions. In accordance with the extravagant tastes of deities, the artificer has hung a single glittering jewel in each "eye" of the net, and since the net itself is infinite in dimension, the jewels are infinite in number. There hang the jewels, glittering like stars in the first magnitude, a wonderful sight to behold. If we now arbitrarily select one of these jewels for inspection and look closely at it, we will discover that in its polished surface there are reflected all the other jewels in the net, infinite in number. Not only that, but each of the jewels reflected in this one jewel is also reflecting all the other jewels, so that there is an infinite reflecting process occurring." 
-- Francis Harold Cook, Hua-Yen Buddhism: The Jewel Net of Indra

So of what use are these perspectives and constructs to the practice of international development?  Starting with “self”, in the UL quadrant, application may go something like this.  In any situation you find yourself working in, are drawn to, ask yourself the following:

  • As someone working in [economic development/sustainable development/health work/ …] (by way of a few examples), where in my own life is there [economic pathology/unsustainable practices/lack of self care…]?
  • What is drawing me to develop others, to help others?  What are my deepest intentions, in doing this work? If I am utterly truthful, what are my 'covert intentions'? Where in my own life am I not supporting/developing/helping myself?
  • What is drawing me to work “out there”, in communities that are not mine? What is outside that is not met inside?

One way to work with these questions (and other similar ones that may be more appropriate to your personal situation) is to use the Diamond Heart technique of working with a partner, and taking turns to ask each question repeatedly (perhaps 5-10 times) and to witness one another as you drop into the layers and creases and wrinkles that these inquiries unfold. If faced honestly, and returned to again and again, these questions yield shadow gold. They go a long way to supporting both personal authenticity, and the allied lightness, agility and flexibility that is such an asset when you find yourself continuously working on the edges of your comfort zones, as is so often the case in the arena of international development. Sound dojo work for developing “self-as-instrument”.

Our summer newsletter just went out. It includes some brief reports from the field--specifically on integral supply chains and inroads into the InterAmerican Development Bank--as well as details about an Integral Praxis Manual being designed and developed with a training session and a free 'sangha call' (or community conference call) amongst IWB members starting this September! Please take a look:

Summer Newsletter

 

Practitioners in international development are constantly engaging social holons in a change process. Change occurs quite differently in social groups than it does in individuals, requiring us to develop different skills and understanding. Drawing on social psychology, on Wilber's Excerpt D, and on our own field experience, Integral Without Borders is holding a field learning event in Cusco, Peru to further examine the dynamics of cultures, societies and systems, as well as to learn skills to engage a truly integrally-informed social change.

Dates: Oct 16-Oct 26, 2012

Application deadline: August 30, 2012 (please apply with application form below)

Cost: $1500 (Includes accommodation, in-country travel, food, entrance fee to ruins, organization and facilitation. Does not include airfare.)  


Registration Fee

 

This year’s theme for the Peru event is “Engaging Cultures, Societies, and Systems.” In partnership with One Sky and the Association for the Conservation of the Amazon Watershed (ACCA) we’ll explore the nuances and complexities of engaging social groups, cultures, and systems in development issues. We’ll visit the Amazon, the internationally acclaimed city of Cusco, the Sacred Valley of the Incas, and Machu Picchu. These meetings offer a way to be inspired in a community of other practitioners, to experience how to apply integral thinking to global issues, to hone your skillful means as a practitioner, and be refreshed with new ideas and practices.

We will experientially examine the influence and engagement of cultures, societies and systems in an integral approach to international development. We’ll examine the staggering weight of the economic systems of which we are a part, the depth and nuance of culture and cultural change, as well as an applied look at how these dynamics influence and inform sustainable development objectives.

A particular applied focus of that will be on the integral work being carried out by NGOs One Sky, Drishti and ACCA on environmental change and social change in the Amazon headwaters, including some of the communities in the high Andes mountains. Climate change, in particular, will impact this region with water shortages and unpredictable weather events that disrupts local food and agricultural systems. Our project seeks to engage communities in a transformative change process in which the role women play in local markets are used both to support systemic changes in the economy, as well as to support social changes in discourse. This is not a one-off project, but rather we hope to design a model with deep structures in mind that can be adapted to local surface structures of other regionss. The participants of the IWB event will directly engage in this project, as well as bring their hearts and minds to contemplate and refine its delivery. This is no theoretical task at hand; it is the real thing!

Overview of the Trip

Below is a tentative itinerary for the trip, which may be subject to changes. On this tour, participants will travel to Lima, then fly to Puerto Maldonado in the Amazon Basin, then fly to Cusco, the hub of the regions rich cultural heritage and an international tourism destination, and culminate the experience in the Sacred Valley of the Inkas and in Machu Picchu.

Lima

Our time in Lima will be one of gathering together. It will be a time of introductions, getting to know each other, and creating We space. Everyone will arrive slowly over the day, and have an evening session together at the hotel and dinner together.

Cusco

We’ll fly to Cusco the following day. This will be our base for the entire stay, from which we will be visiting communities, meeting with organizations, and getting an embodied sense of the issue at hand: how we can engage cultures, societies and systems with an Integral approach to design and enact transformative shifts towards sustainability.  

Our base will be a lovely hotel run by another NGO in which we’ll have theory sessions, discussions, spiritual practice, shadow work, and more. It is walking distance to the center of the city, where we’ll find great restaurants and stores.

Our time in Cusco is for deeply exploring the stages of cultural development, and applying our understanding of this to the theme of the trip. Considering carefully these cultural stages is crucial for effective engagement on a global issue like sustainable markets. Our first day there is a rest and recollection day. In the following two days, we’ll visit various sites which offer us an opportunity to feel and directly experience the ‘worldspace’ of different worldviews and value systems. We’ll first visit the animistic ruins of an Inkan sacred site, Saqsaywaman, experiencing the weight, grandeur, and symbolism of the magic worldview. The following morning we’ll attend a Catholic mass in the city’s main cathedral, and feeling into the mythic tones that interweave this culture and set the bounds for its expression. That afternoon, we’ll visit the black market in Cusco, where the globalized modern world comes slamming onto the scene in loud colors, noise, and cheap goods, creating both grave problems as well as great potential. What does the magic, mythic, and modern worldviews tell us about the world? How can our deeper embodied experience of these worldviews help inform how we then engage cross-culturally (and cross-attitudinally) in fostering transformative change?

We’ll take up what preminent world systems theorist Immanuel Wallerstein has called "the central question of the 21st Century," namely: how to respond to the needs and demands of indigenous cultures. If we believe individuals and collectives evolve, what does it mean to "preserve the culture and heritage" of any group? What examples of premodern, modern, and postmodern syntheses exist, and how can a culture transcend and include it’s own cultural heritage for a resilient future? If we believe in the right of any individual or collective to develop and evolve as much as possible at their own pace (though admittedly this has rarely been historically the case), trancending and including their own culture and heritage, then we must take some steps to ensure autonomy in relevant areas. "Let 'er rip" globalization and capitalism needs to be moderated. Yet, on the other hand, globalization offers opportunities from which many benefit, including these Peruvian communities. Which means we really need to think about what is healthy vs. unhealthy in capitalist expansion/globalization. These and other such lines of inquiry will weave the trip like an enduring tapestry.

Exploring these types of questions on culture, we'll visit the Amazon Conservation Association (ACCA) in the office in Cusco, learning about the impacts of globalization and the variations of economic, social and environmental change that is occuring in this region. We'll meet with other community-based organizations in the Sacred Valley, as well as with a higher level development institution, providing us ample diverse perspectives on the topic at hand.

Sacred Valley

For following two days, the group will go to the Sacred Valley of the Incas where they will visit community-based organizations as well as some of the ancient sites of the Inca empire.  Our time in the Sacred Valley will include some community visits, to hear from indigenous Quechua people about the cultural change their families have experienced in the past two generations. This will also include some time for relaxation, spiritual practice, for hiking and taking in the scenery of this extraordinary place on the planet.

Machu Picchu

Finally, the group will embark on a full-day trip to Machu Picchu, which was recently established as one of the seven wonders of the world! This place whispers of a lost culture, a culture obliterated in the path of colonialism. Yet, has it been lost? We’ll contemplate what part might have been transcended and included, and what part remains forever in the annals of history. As evolution ensues, we are pulled between karma and creativity, and we witness loss as well as gain. Honoring the retro-romantics but also situating as evolutionaries, we’ll meditate on what wisdom can be found in the smooth, immense stones of this world wonder.

This is an action-packed trip with an intellectual twist, an integrative tone, and a spiritual anchor. Participants will be able to explore both the physical terrain of Peru, the intellectual terrain of integral theory, and hone their embodied presence as integral practitioners. As well as contribute their own expertise to how we can engage change processes with greater depth and skill towards transformation.

Itinerary at a glance

Day 1

Lima

Time zone adjustments, opening session, we-space building, visiting the city

Oct 16

Day 2

Cusco

Settling in, setting the stage, beginning the discussion. Afternoon acclimatize. Dinner out, evening session.

Oct 17

Day 3

Cusco

Community visits, getting the lay of the land.

Oct 18

Day 4

Cusco

Morning session contextualizing the following three exercises: Magic, animistic worldview (Saqsaywaman in the afternoon), shamanic ritual in the evening. Oct 19

Day 5

Cusco

Mythic worldview (cathedral for morning mass), Modern worldview (midday tourist trade, mid afternoon black market visit).

Evening debrief.

Oct 20

Day 6

Ollantytambo and Calca


Community visits and field trip to explore impacts of globalization, both healthy and unhealthy, and examine the changes that are imminent for the region.

Oct 21

Day

Sacred Valley

 

Overnight trip to Sacred Valley.

 

Oct 22

Day 8

Sacred Valley

 

Stay in Lodge. Process day, sessions, hiking.

 

Oct 23

Day 9

Machu Picchu

 

 

Day trip to the ruins. Field exercises and discussions.

Back to Cusco that evening

 

 

Oct 24

Day 10

Cusco

Closing: Sharing our Experience (each person presents an integral synthesis about the trip). Morning to design, present over lunch.

Afternoon to pack, shop, take care of loose ends.

Dinner together.

Leave the following day.

Oct 25

 

Trip Leaders

Gail Hochachka– Gail has led a group of JFK students on a similar trip to Peru to visit the Queros and Amazon Conservation Association in 2009. Gail is fluent in Spanish, has been involved in doing an integral baseline assessment and working with One Sky in Peru since 2006. Before that she did a research study in Peru for the International Development Research Centre regarding Integral Theory in post conflict Peru.  She has travelled and worked extensively in Latin America and knows Peru well.  She is a director of IWB and has been a key organizer of all of the IWB international events to date.

Michael Simpson– is the executive director of One Sky and has been working with the Amazon Conservation Association in Peru since 2006.  He has twenty-five years experience travelling and working in Latin America and has been involved in numerous delegations to the region.  With a background in documentary film as well as a long history founding and leading two environmental NGOs in international development work, Mike brings a huge breadth of experience to the room. His stories are not ones you want to miss! Fluently bilingual, he is currently a director of IWB and has attended all of the international meetings to date.

Emine Kiray– is a director of IWB and has previously organized and hosted two of the meetings in Istanbul, Turkey. Emine has a Doctorate in economics and spends her time between Boston and Istanbul where she is immersed in integral theory. She was on the Presidents Circle of Integral Institute and remains a close friend and colleague of Ken Wilber. Emine has been deeply involved in the Integral Institute for many years and brings a strong theoretical knowledge of Integral Theory to our meetings. 

Interested? Contact Us.

 

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Integrating Spirituality into a Post-secular Approach to Development

This paper takes up the issue of how spirituality has become practically absent in urban development practise/ theory, as well as in international development practise and its theoretical discourse, by examining the idea of a post-secular approach to spirituality and by looking at acase study in the developing world.

Download Resource: 
Authored or produced by: 
Hochachka, Gail
Publication or release date: 
2012

 

The purpose of this short paper is to suggest a different paradigm for an increased alignment between Donors, Agents of Change (AOC) who are often NGOs and Beneficiaries, which ultimately is likely to be more authentic, more effective and more durable.

Integral Without Borders and integralMENTORS are starting a discussion to grow these ideas - Jock Noble of Worldvision (Australia) has put a first draft of his initial ideas into the attached paper, following an ongoing discussion with various 'players' in the sector.  We now invite IWB and iM members to join this discussion by commenting in detail on any aspects of the ideas in the paper.

Go to the discussion here.

We will also in due course open a Facebook page to structure comments.

 

 

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Integral Development-JockNoble.pdf601.17 KB

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